Atkinson Grimshaw
Atkinson Grimshaw's Oil Paintings
Atkinson Grimshaw Museum
6 September 1836 -- 13 October 1893, Victorian-era artist.

About Us

90,680 paintings total now
Toll Free: 1-877-240-4507


Atkinson, welcome & enjoy!

Atkinson Grimshaw
Reflections on the Aire On Strike
mk174 1879 Oil on canvas 81.2x121.9cm
ID: 44674

Atkinson Grimshaw Reflections on the Aire On Strike
Go Back!

Atkinson Grimshaw Reflections on the Aire On Strike

Go Back!


Atkinson Grimshaw

British 1836-1893 Atkinson Grimshaw Gallery Grimshaw's primary influence was the Pre-Raphaelites. True to the Pre-Raphaelite style, he put forth landscapes of accurate color and lighting, and vivid detail. He often painted landscapes that typified seasons or a type of weather; city and suburban street scenes and moonlit views of the docks in London, Leeds, Liverpool, and Glasgow also figured largely in his art. By applying his skill in lighting effects, and unusually careful attention to detail, he was often capable of intricately describing a scene, while strongly conveying its mood. His "paintings of dampened gas-lit streets and misty waterfronts conveyed an eerie warmth as well as alienation in the urban scene." Dulce Domum (1855), on whose reverse Grimshaw wrote, "mostly painted under great difficulties," captures the music portrayed in the piano player, entices the eye to meander through the richly decorated room, and to consider the still and silent young lady who is meanwhile listening. Grimshaw painted more interior scenes, especially in the 1870s, when he worked until the influence of James Tissot and the Aesthetic Movement. On Hampstead Hill is considered one of Grimshaw's finest, exemplifying his skill with a variety of light sources, in capturing the mood of the passing of twilight into the onset of night. In his later career this use of twilight, and urban scenes under yellow light were highly popular, especially with his middle-class patrons. His later work included imagined scenes from the Greek and Roman empires, and he also painted literary subjects from Longfellow and Tennyson ?? pictures including Elaine and The Lady of Shalott. (Grimshaw named all of his children after characters in Tennyson's poems.) In the 1880s, Grimshaw maintained a London studio in Chelsea, not far from the comparable facility of James Abbott McNeill Whistler. After visiting Grimshaw, Whistler remarked that "I considered myself the inventor of Nocturnes until I saw Grimmy's moonlit pictures."[9] Unlike Whistler's Impressionistic night scenes, however, Grimshaw worked in a realistic vein: "sharply focused, almost photographic," his pictures innovated in applying the tradition of rural moonlight images to the Victorian city, recording "the rain and mist, the puddles and smoky fog of late Victorian industrial England with great poetry." Some artists of Grimshaw's period, both famous and obscure, generated rich documentary records; Vincent Van Gogh and James Smetham are good examples. Others, like Edward Pritchett, left nothing. Grimshaw left behind him no letters, journals, or papers; scholars and critics have little material on which to base their understanding of his life and career. Grimshaw died 13 October 1893, and is buried in Woodhouse cemetery, Leeds. His reputation rested, and his legacy is probably based on, his townscapes. The second half of the twentieth century saw a major revival of interest in Grimshaw's work, with several important exhibits of his canon.  Related Paintings of Atkinson Grimshaw :. | Reflections on the Thames Westminster | Golden Light | Sliver Moonlight | Bowder Ston, | Forge Valley,near Scarborough |
Related Artists:
Yevgeny Lanceray
Francesco Granacci
1477-1543 Italian Francesco Granacci Galleries Born at Villamagna di Volterra, he trained in Florence at the studio of Domenico Ghirlandaio, and was employed painting frescoes for San Marco on commission of Lorenzo de'Medici. He is featured in Giorgio Vasari's Vite. His early works were influenced from the style of Filippino Lippi, like the Enthroned Madonna between Saint Michael and John the Baptist (Staatliche Museen, Berlin), Adoration of the Child (Honolulu Academy of Arts) and four histories of Saint John the Baptist. In 1508, Granacci went to Rome, where, with other artists, he helped Michelangelo transfer cartoons to the Sistine chapel ceiling. The two artists were lifelong friends. Returning to Florence, Granacci painted a Madonna with Child with Saints Francesco and Jerome for the Augustinian convent of San Gallo (now in the Gallery of the Academy), a Madonna della Cintola for the Company of San Benedetto Bigi, and in 1515 he participated in creating the decorations to celebrate the visit to Florence of Pope Leo X.
Isaac Fuller
c.1606--72 English painter. He was renowned in his day for large historical, mythological and biblical subjects but was also a very able portrait painter. According to Vertue, he studied under Fran?ois Perrier in France c. 1630, and in 1644 he is documented as working in Oxford, at the same time as William Dobson. There he painted altarpieces, including a Resurrection for All Souls College (a wild imitation of Michelangelo, which John Evelyn considered 'too full of nakeds for a chapel'), a Last Judgement for Magdalen College and a Last Supper for Wadham College. None of these works is known to survive. He also copied Dobson's Beheading of John the Baptist, substituting the heads with portraits of his friends. On moving to London, Fuller worked on decorative schemes for churches, taverns and private houses and continued to paint portraits. In 1654 he published a drawing book, Un libro di disegnare, with 15 etched plates, but there are no known copies. Much of his decorative work was destroyed in the Great Fire in 1666, including that in the Painters' Hall and St Mary Abchurch. Vertue admired his erotic life-size Bacchic figures in the Mitre Tavern in Fenchurch Street. Five crudely painted canvases commemorating the Adventures of Charles II after the Battle of Worcester in 1651 (London, N.P.G.) are his only surviving decorative works. Fuller's reputation as a painter rests mainly on three variants of a Rembrandtesque Self-portrait (1670; Oxford, Bodleian Lib.; Oxford, Queen's Coll

Atkinson Grimshaw
All the Atkinson Grimshaw's Oil Paintings

Supported by oil paintings and picture frames 

Copyright Reserved